Down South Westies Monthly Newsletter

What's New This October

October 8, 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In This Issue:

1.        Saying Goodbye To Abby's Pups!

2.        Westie Mouthing...Biting Puppies!

3.        Leash Pulling...How To Prevent It!

4.        Sprinkles' First Litter Of Three!


1. Saying Goodbye to Abby's Pups!

Abby's pups are going to their new homes in NY, FL, and two pups to TX.  We get so attached to them we really hate to see them leave.  It always helps to know they are going to loving, caring homes.  We make a special effort to be sure that is the case.  We do not place a pup in every home from which we receive a request.  We are sure to place the pup into a home where we feel comfortable the pup will be "king" or "queen"!

Follow this link to see the pups and Abby:
www.downsouthwesties.com/abby's_pups.htm

2. Westie Mouthing...Biting Puppies!

We occasionally have someone contact us asking, "How can I stop my pup from nipping and biting"?  A puppy likes biting and chewing on almost anything that enters his world.  It is interesting to watch the littermates as they jump, role and tumble, fuss and growl, and bite each other.  Biting teaches them how to use their main hunting tool, their mouth, with all those teeth!  Unfortunately, this carries over into their interactions with the members of their new home.  He doesn't have the littermates to play and bite on, so he turns to you.  Puppies have very sharp teeth, and a bite or nip can hurt and be terrifying to small children.  Some animal behaviorists suggest a method which startles the biting pup.  As the pup chomps down, make a sudden, loud "AWRP" sound.  Try imitating the sound a littermate might make if bitten by the pup.  If done correctly, they say, you will be surprised at how instantly the pup removes his mouth and looks bewildered.  At that point, quickly substitute a toy the pup can chew on.  Never entice your pup to bite you.  Games like tug-of-war and waving your hands in front of the puppy may encourage him to bite.


3. Leash Pulling...How To Prevent It!

One of the most common behavior problems that people have with their puppies is pulling on the leash.  It is important to start the pup early.  It is a habit that is hard to break.  One method is called the "slack leash" method.  The following instructions come from Angela Maupin, Certified Dog Trainer and author.  A regular buckle collar and 6 foot leash are required for this training.  The first step to teaching loose leash walking is to keep in mind that leaving the house on a leash is a reward!  Secondly, remember that if you continue to walk while your puppy is pulling, you are, in fact, teaching your dog to "mush".

First, put the collar and leash on the pup and stand in one place.  Give your pup enough leash so he can walk about four feet from you.  Reward your pup every time the leash goes slack.  This method is best when teamed with a reward marker, like "Yes" or a clicker.  When you are ready to begin walking say, "Let's go", and take a few steps.  Chances are good that your pup will begin to pull immediately, so plant your feet and stop walking.  Wait for the leash to go slack, give a good reward and try walking again.  Try not to yank or "check" the leash, which is a natural response.  If it is difficult for you to stop "checking", put your leash hand in your pocket.  You should also try to be very vocal with your puppy.  Puppies have a very short attention span, and talking in a high pitched voice will help your puppy keep his attention on you.

Be sure your pup has had occasion to run off energy before your training session begins.  Have playtime first, and then begin when the pup has settled down.


4. Sprinkles' First Litter Of Three!

At two years of age, Sprinkles had her first litter on Tuesday, October 5.  She had two females and one male.  Her pups are already booked.  Sprinkles has that typical Westie spirit and will never grow up.  She has that playful, loving temperament that makes you laugh!  Sprinkles and Cordy live in my daughter's home.  Montana, age 7, enjoys the playful spirit of the dogs and they spend countless hours together.

 

 

 Shop now and get Free Shipping!